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CEEMID is a pan European music data integration system that could provide to be a model and starting point of building a European Music Observatory based on open data, open-source software in open collaboration with the industry, statisticians and academia, using best statistics, data science and AI practices. It uses many data sources about the audience, the creators of music, music works and recordings, its circulation globally and its economy. CEEMID has created thousands of high-value, hard music industry indicators via integrate using open data sources, industry data sources, surveys and various APIs to relevant other data sources.

CEEMID is aiming to transfer thousands of indicators that are reproducible and verifiable, open-source software that creates them to the European Music Observatory to give Europe-wide acces timely, reliable, actionable statistics and indicators for the music industry, policymakers and music professionals.

Data Coverage

We believe that CEEMID is a viable piloting point for the European Music Observatory. Our primary goal is to provide thousands of indicators for the three pillars of the European Music Observatory [1].

Because we cover all areas of innovative uses (predictive AI modelling, forecasting, royalty setting and pricing, audience targetting, policy indicators) we believe that further data domains must be covered.

  • data on business users of music, such as restaurants, hotels, television, radio, etc.

Geographic Coverage

1. CEEMID is primarily focusing on data from the European Union. We aim to create indicators for each European Union member state, and whenever possible, each European NUTS1 level region (provinces, Bundeslander, etc) and NUTS2 level regions. We aim to introduce city level indicators in 2020.

2. Our secondary focus is Europe, including the European Economic Area, (potential) candidate countries, and the United Kingdom.

3. Whenever possible, we collect comparative data globally, particularly from countries with a developed, strong music market, such as Australia, Canada, Brazil, Japan, South Korea and of course the United States of America.

Historically CEEMID started out as the Central and Eastern European Music Industry Databases out of necessity following a CISAC Good Governance Seminar for European Societies in 2013. The adoption of European single market and copyright rules, and the increased activity of competition authority and regulators required a more structured approach to set collective royalty and compensations tariffs in a region that was regarded traditionally as data-poor with lower quantitiy of industry and government data sources available, but quickly covered the whole European area.

Data Integration

CEEMID integrates various data sources and information sources to create timely, reliable and actionable information. In some cases, CEEMID creates original databases, in other cases, it used open or confidential databases.

Data Sources

CEEMID uses only open source software to create new databases or integrate existing ones. Our aim is to make our software code and our data available for the European Music Observatory.

We believe in the value of peer-review, and some of our complex program code is already released as open source program as part of the rOpenGov initiative.

Use cases

In far more detail, within national contexts:

  • The Slovak Music Industry Report 2019[2] provides business and policy advice to increase the employment and value added in the Slovak economy by strengthening creative and cultural industry, and particularly the music industry.
  • Private Copying in Croatia[3] shows the market competition between licensed and non-licensed music and audiovisual works and argues for a better private copying remuneration and empirically estimates the value gap for Croatia.
  • The audience chapters of the public Hungarian music industry report [4] provides business and policy advice to increase the employment and value added in the Slovak economy by strengthening creative and cultural industry, and particularly the music industry. The subsequent private versions of The Competition of Unlicensed, Licensed and Illegal uses on the Markets of Music and Audiovisual Works[5] show the competition between licensed and non-licensed music and audiovisual works and estimates the consumer benefit from private copying. These reports empirically estimate the value gap for Hungary.
  • The Growth of the Hungarian Popular Music Repertoire: Who Creates It And How Does It Find An Audience [6] laid out the early data gathering concept of CEEMID for the supply side of the industry.

References

  1. |Introducing the CEEMID Observatory. Presentation in Brussels, 28 September 2019.
  2. Daniel Antal: Správa o slovenskom hudobnom priemysle (2019) | doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/V3BE9.
  3. Daniel Antal: Private Copying in Croatia (2019) |https://www.zamp.hr/uploads/documents/Studija_privatno_kopiranje_u_Hrvatskoj_DA_CEEMID.pdf.
  4. Daniel Antal: A ProArt zeneipari jelentése (2015)|http://zeneipar.info/letoltes/proart-zeneipari-jelentes-2015.pdf.
  5. Daniel Antal: The Competition of Unlicensed, Licensed and Illegal uses on the Markets of Music and Audiovisual Works [A szabad felhasználások, a jogosított tartalmak és az illegális felhasználások versenye a zenék és audiovizuális alkotások hazai piacán], 2017, 2018, 2019. Artisjus. Business confidential.
  6. The Growth of the Hungarian Popular Music Repertoire: Who Creates It And How Does It Find An Audience. In Made in Hungary, 1st ed. Studies in Popular Music. New York, NY: USA: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-138-91587-9